The Power of Good Will

I have a theory. My theory is that there is an inverse relationship between status/power/rank and open demonstrations of good will. (When I was an engineer we spoke gleefully about inverse relationships as if they were the best kind to have.) In short, the higher we climb in life (status, power, rank) the less we see open kindness within that “elite” community. Life becomes more dog eat dog, me versus you, and good will between competitors (those other leaders in the corporate, non-profit, sports world, or anyone deemed as “on the opposing team”) can be difficult to find. Good will may look like weakness to some, but of course, the opposite is true. However, this notion of weakness can make it more difficult for our young people to understand that good will can be part of a viable success strategy. Plus, it’s free. Doesn’t cost you a dime.

How To Build A Home For Your Team

Recently I was asked by Clint Carlos of Soar.com to tell my “best strengths story” about how I help teams reach their full potential. But I don’t want to talk about strengths. I want to talk about how I build a home for my teams – a place for them to thrive and grow. And, I want to convince you to build a home for your team, too.

You’re Too Old!

I was walking toward Coach Weidenbach’s office when I saw Michael Brown coming off the ice. He had a big grin on his face. I threw him a friendly wave, all the while marveling at his height (6’ 7” without skates and he’s a FRESHMAN). He waved back and then bellowed, “You’re too old!” I wasn’t sure I heard him right. “Pardon me?” I said. He smiled and eagerly repeated, “You’re too old!” Then it dawned on me – he was investing in my success! I burst out laughing and thanked him. Before you dismiss us as crazy, read on.

KINSHIP

Kinship. Noun. “The feeling of being connected to other people.” Our performance, and even our survival, depends on the feeling of kinship we have with others. To underscore its importance, I will share two stories of two very people, from two very different parts of the world, whose lives were transformed by kinship. Both were problem children; nobody benefits more from kinship than a problem child. Why? Because others often turn against them, leaving them feeling isolated, undervalued, and beleaguered. In such circumstances, kinship can be a lifesaver.

Tune Your Talents and Rock

English missionary James Hudson Taylor quipped, “Do not have your concert first, and then tune your instrument afterwards.” He’s right! Here are 5 tips to tune your talents so that when your moment arrives, you hit the perfect high note at exactly the right time.